Analogue: Scalability in Data Usage

At the intersection of big data and machine learning are patterns and analyses that reveal trends and causes. To use healthcare as an example, sensors built into wearable medical devices open windows to improved, individualized healthcare based on a rapidly expanding set of clinical, lab, physiological, and personal data. (A patient diagnosed with hypertension might wear a device that sends information to an application that detects ongoing changes in blood pressure, respiration, or other conditions in real time and alerts a physician when anomalies occur.)

Predictive data technology moves past the goal of gaining insights and into the realm of insights on insights: namely, choosing the trends that require action. If the information received from the wearable monitor is utilized as cross-channel data, the challenge becomes making sense of the insight gained from the data and selecting the appropriate action. With this, the perspective may move from a simple focus on the instantaneous symptoms and treatment of hypertension to a holistic view of the patient’s respiratory, renal, and other systems’ response to standardized treatment.

The Human Factor

The relevance of obtaining cross-channel data from a hypertension patient is most apparent in the universal desire for individualized care. Scalable machine learning searches for efficient algorithms that can work with any amount of data and detect hidden insights. These insights yield logical, adaptive reasoning in performing specific actions, without consuming greater amounts of computing resources. Limits do exist, but predictive data technology adds another dimension to the interpretation of vast data sets. One that, in a business context, means greater efficiency and more thorough self-evaluation on a global scale.0

In the marketplace, insights gained from cross-channel data emphasize the individual’s ability to change. While individuals may defy—with varying levels of deliberateness—predictability, machine learning and predictive data technology take an unrestrained, multi-dimensional view of preferences, real-time behavioral patterns, and possible intent. Thus the view of the “customer journey” is expanded: and a mass of stops at a big box store from which a correlation would have normally been determined in retrospect is now a targeted real-time marketing effort—with the intuition to make progressively better use of progressively expanding data.0

Moving to a New Meaning

Terms like “segmentation analysis” and “adaptive marketing” are themselves harbingers of a system that will soon replace the marketing philosophies of old. However, these new practices may themselves prove to be stepping stones to an even broader view of personalized marketing. Real freedom from scale is measured over time: through predictive data technology that offers personalized strategies for small businesses, large businesses, and corporations as they grow. This new outlook recognizes the consumer’s awareness of the marketplace and the complexity of their decisions, providing insights into profit margins based not only on the instantaneous relationship between product and cost, but also by an adaptive view of long-term customer behavior and loyalty.